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This bottleneck is at an angle for easy fill and drinking

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This bottleneck is at an angle for easy fill and drinking

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samuel
176 days ago
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Ship it
Cambridge, Massachusetts
duerig
176 days ago
It would be really interesting to see how they manufacture these. Typical bottles use high pressure air molding from radially symmetric blanks. So it seems like they will either have to come up with a new way of doing that or injection mold two halves and weld them together.
duerig
176 days ago
Specifically, I'm thinking about the steps here where the blank is heated and then blown into shape: https://youtu.be/Gt9DRifRwn0?t=192 At the least the different shape would mean that the wall of the bottle would not be of uniform thickness. I'd really like to see how a manfuacturing engineer would game out the changes in the process to make it work.
samuel
176 days ago
Well that was a fun watch
ChrisDL
176 days ago
Yeah I feel like the structural integrity and how to build it would be only reasons not to do this. But it seems like one of those "of course this is how it should work" type of situations off-handedly.
kclowers
175 days ago
hmmm
kclowers
175 days ago
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Seattle, WA, US
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Tower of Babel

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Soon, linguists will be wandering around everywhere, saying things like "colorless green ideas sleep furiously" and "more people have been to Russia than I have," and speech will become unintelligible.
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kclowers
175 days ago
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Seattle, WA, US
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Vatican Investigating Pope Francis Liking Instagram Photo of Woman's Butt

jwz
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"Magnae clunes mihi placent, nec possum de hac re mentiri."

Last week, the Pope's Instagram account liked a photo of a woman in a miniature schoolgirl outfit sticking her butt out.

According to Catholic News Agency, "the Vatican is investigating usage of the papal Instagram account" now and started by making sure the Instagram account "unliked" the photo on November 14th.

In the meantime, the model whose picture was deemed favorable by the papal Instagram account, Natalia Garibotto, is taking it as a good omen. "At least I'm going to heaven," she tweeted.

Previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously.

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kclowers
251 days ago
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Seattle, WA, US
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The True Name of the Bear

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Thank you to Gretchen McCulloch for fielding this question, and sorry that as a result the world's foremost internet linguist has been devoured by the brown one. She will be missed.
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kclowers
263 days ago
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Seattle, WA, US
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Everett v1.0.3 released!

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What is it?

Everett is a configuration library for Python apps.

Goals of Everett:

  1. flexible configuration from multiple configured environments

  2. easy testing with configuration

  3. easy documentation of configuration for users

From that, Everett has the following features:

  • is composeable and flexible

  • makes it easier to provide helpful error messages for users trying to configure your software

  • supports auto-documentation of configuration with a Sphinx autocomponent directive

  • has an API for testing configuration variations in your tests

  • can pull configuration from a variety of specified sources (environment, INI files, YAML files, dict, write-your-own)

  • supports parsing values (bool, int, lists of things, classes, write-your-own)

  • supports key namespaces

  • supports component architectures

  • works with whatever you're writing--command line tools, web sites, system daemons, etc

v1.0.3 released!

This is a minor maintenance update that fixes a couple of minor bugs, addresses a Sphinx deprecation issue, drops support for Python 3.4 and 3.5, and adds support for Python 3.8 and 3.9 (largely adding those environments to the test suite).

Why you should take a look at Everett

At Mozilla, I'm using Everett for a variety of projects: Mozilla symbols server, Mozilla crash ingestion pipeline, and some other tooling. We use it in a bunch of other places at Mozilla, too.

Everett makes it easy to:

  1. deal with different configurations between local development and server environments

  2. test different configuration values

  3. document configuration options

First-class docs. First-class configuration error help. First-class testing. This is why I created Everett.

If this sounds useful to you, take it for a spin. It's a drop-in replacement for python-decouple and os.environ.get('CONFIGVAR', 'default_value') style of configuration so it's easy to test out.

Enjoy!

Where to go for more

For more specifics on this release, see here: https://everett.readthedocs.io/en/latest/history.html#october-28th-2020

Documentation and quickstart here: https://everett.readthedocs.io/

Source code and issue tracker here: https://github.com/willkg/everett

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kclowers
275 days ago
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Seattle, WA, US
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on abandoning the X server

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There's been some recent discussion about whether the X server is abandonware. As the person arguably most responsible for its care and feeding over the last 15 years or so, I feel like I have something to say about that.

The thing about being the maintainer of a public-facing project for nearly the whole of your professional career is it's difficult to separate your own story from the project. So I'm not going to try to be dispassionate, here. I started working on X precisely because free software had given me options and capabilities that really matter, and I feel privileged to be able to give that back. I can't talk about that without caring about it.

So here's the thing: X works extremely well for what it is, but what it is is deeply flawed. There's no shame in that, it's 33 years old and still relevant, I wish more software worked so well on that kind of timeframe. But using it to drive your display hardware and multiplex your input devices is choosing to make your life worse.

It is, however, uniquely well suited to a very long life as an application compatibility layer. Though the code happens to implement an unfortunate specification, the code itself is quite well structured, easy to hack on, and not far off from being easily embeddable.

The issue, then, is how to get there. And I don't have any real desire to get there while still pretending that the xfree86 hardware-backed server code is a real thing. Sorry, I guess, but I've worked on xfree86-derived servers for very nearly as long as XFree86-the-project existed, and I am completely burnt out on that on its own merits, let alone doing that and also being release manager and reviewer of last resort. You can only apply so much thrust to the pig before you question why you're trying to make it fly at all.

So, is Xorg abandoned? To the extent that that means using it to actually control the display, and not just keep X apps running, I'd say yes. But xserver is more than xfree86. Xwayland, Xwin, Xephyr, Xvnc, Xvfb: these are projects with real value that we should not give up. A better way to say it is that we can finally abandon xfree86.

And if that sounds like a world you'd like to see, please, come talk to us, let's make it happen. I'd be absolutely thrilled to see someone take this on, and I'm happy to be your guide through the server internals.

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kclowers
275 days ago
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Seattle, WA, US
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