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Ignite Realtime Blog: Openfire 4.6.0 is released

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The Ignite Realtime Community is elated to be able to announce the release of Openfire version 4.6.0!

This release is the first non-patch release in 10 months, which brings a healthy amount of new features, as well as bug fixes.

I’d like to explicitly thank the many people in the community that have supported this release: not only were a significant amount of code contributions provided, the feedback that we get in our chatroom and on our community forums is of great value to us!

Highlights of this release include extensively improved XMPP protocol support, particularly around Pubsub and PEP and better compatibility with higher-end encryption parameters out-of-the-box, which should particularly benefit environments that make heavy use of server-to-server federation.

This release includes experimental support for federated multi-user chat for constrained environments (as defined in XEP-0289). This feature aims to reduce the dependency on highly reliable, high volume network connectivity.

The complete changelog contains approximately 80 issues that have been resolved in this release.

We invite you to give this release a try. The process of upgrading from an earlier version is as lightweight as ever. It is outlined in the Openfire upgrade guide. Please note that, if desired, a significant amount of professional partners is available that can provide commercial support for upgrading, customization, or other services.

We’re always happy to hear about your experiences, good or bad! Please consider dropping a note in the community forums or hang out with us in our web support groupchat.

You can find Openfire release artifacts on the download page. These are the the applicable sha1sums:

3747eb30a9c301cb4e169ea58682bffaec928d45  openfire-4.6.0-1.i686.rpm
446dd40b68e89311f4e7de62af4cb1dfe44cff2d  openfire-4.6.0-1.noarch.rpm
74023de1be0211bbc6879173bc9a5875605cd375  openfire-4.6.0-1.x86_64.rpm
0db33511ff833dc904ea7845d6eb3294cf418782  openfire_4.6.0_all.deb
fe7684d7ddf12896d138af64adb2d79f62874c29  openfire_4_6_0_bundledJRE.exe
cb490c5762c2f2f4ccd70a5a09b5faab59dc5e99  openfire_4_6_0_bundledJRE_x64.exe
fb915d112f522860fdd419c8bc0371f7a4a2105a  openfire_4_6_0.dmg
a5fada882ace449df9056205618e86312a08ec6e  openfire_4_6_0.exe
43a5b890e52b4baa7e8096410a7b398c89ad4d33  openfire_4_6_0.tar.gz
d11cfed06901fef69fcac1c3c4e28f60256baf62  openfire_4_6_0_x64.exe
86e150c2cb9b74c63b3907e3c036cc046c78c5ba  openfire_4_6_0.zip
436f9833fe8d7185c800daf3d35c2d5d11d1f6ea  openfire_src_4_6_0.tar.gz
a3a274b2f12d4cf9f15cb981e6c2b18c78ca07c6  openfire_src_4_6_0.zip

As per usual, we have created a 4.6 branch in our source code repository, that will hold follow-up bug fixes for this release, which will be numbered with 4.6.x identifiers. The main branch will over time evolve into release 4.7. We do not expect to perform more releases on the 4.5 branch.

Thank you for using Openfire!

For other release announcements and news follow us on Twitter

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kclowers
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A billion tiny pendulums could detect the universe's missing mass

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Researchers have proposed a novel method for finding dark matter, the cosmos' mystery material that has eluded detection for decades.
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kclowers
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Biggest carbon dioxide drop: Real-time data show COVID-19's massive impact on global emissions

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While the ongoing coronavirus pandemic continues to threaten millions of lives around the world, the first half of 2020 saw an unprecedented decline in carbon dioxide emissions -- larger than during the financial crisis of 2008, the oil crisis of the 1979, or even World War II.
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kclowers
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Tactical Snacks

jwz
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Food Delivery Workers Forced to Promote Ballot Measure That Decides Their Fate

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We Deliver With Doordash DoorDash is asking restaurants to use bags that promote Prop 22, a controversial ballot measure that would deny delivery drivers basic worker protections | Photo by Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

DoorDash wants restaurants to use “Yes on 22” bags for takeout orders

San Francisco-based food delivery company DoorDash is escalating its promotion of a controversial ballot proposition, sending bags emblazoned with “Yes on 22” to restaurants, which will then hand those same bags off to the app-based delivery drivers whose futures will be determined by that very prop.

As of publication time, companies like Uber, Lyft, Postmates, Instacart, and DoorDash have spent a combined $185 million to support Prop 22, a ballot measure that seeks to ensure that California’s ride-hail and delivery drivers are classified as independent contractors, despite a 2020 law that says that they must be classified as employees, and receive the wages, benefits, and other guarantees that full employment entails.

As the election has neared, the tech companies’ promotion of Prop 22 has “gotten more desperate,” says Maria Crawford, an organizer with the Gig Workers Collective. One example of this is Instacart’s prompt to shoppers to “retrieve one Prop 22 sticker and insert and place it in your customer’s order,” an initiative reported on by CNN this week.

Another is an email sent to restaurants that contract with DoorDash this week. In the email, restaurants are encouraged to request free bags for takeout, all of which will be emblazoned with “Yes on 22.” “Don’t worry about shipping or production costs — the bags are on us!” the company writes. All restaurants are asked to do is to “use the bags as you would any other takeaway bag now through Election Day.”

Of course, part of using those bags as they would any other would involve handing those bags to a gig worker to deliver, essentially forcing the delivery driver to promote a proposition that many say will deny them their rights.

“Oh my god,” said Crawford, when told about the email by Eater SF. “These companies are so used to exploiting workers, they’re going to push it further and further.”

The measure is supported primarily by “Uber Technologies; Lyft; DoorDash; Instacart; Postmates,” the San Francisco Business Times reports. It’s opposed by most labor unions, and delivery workers groups like the Gig Workers Collective.

It’s a conflict that prompted San Francisco’s District Attorney to sue the company this June, alleging unfair labor practices, and saying that DoorDash is “cheating their employees and cheating the state,” and that its business practices put “law-abiding companies in the position of competing against employers who gain unfair savings by illegally classifying their workers.”

DoorDash has pressed on, raising an additional $400 million in financing, a round that raised its valuation to $16 billion this June. Meanwhile, Instacart announced last week that it had raised an additional $200 million, increasing its valuation to $17.7 billion.

These valuations, says Uber engineer and Prop 22 opponent Kurt Nelson, are one of the reasons the fight to keep its workforce at the contractor level is getting so hot. In an op-ed published on TechCrunch, Nelson says that companies like his want to continue to misclassify workers because they “are subsidizing the product with their free labor,” which makes the possibility that workers might have to be hired potentially devastating to the app-based companies.

According to California employment attorney Beth Ross, moves like DoorDash’s and Instacart’s “raises some red flags,” CNN reports. State labor codes “prohibit CA employers from controlling their employees’ political activities and requiring employees to adhere to the employer’s political views,” Ross says, but requiring delivery workers to ferry these political bags might be doing just that.

When contacted by Eater SF for comment, DoorDash directed us to yes on 22 spokesperson Geoff Vetter. “Each company is communicating with their customers in various ways because of the high stakes in this election,” Vetter says in defense of the bag initiative. “Hundreds of thousands of jobs are on the line, along with the app-based services millions of Californians rely on,” he said via email.

It’s an argument that perplexes Crawford, to say the least. “It would make no sense to me to carry a ‘Yes on 22,’ bag,” Crawford. “I’d basically be handing a customer a bag saying ‘yes on exploiting me.’”

A San Francisco restaurant owner, who declined to be named as they have a contract with DoorDash, tells Eater SF that the bag email has them thinking twice about continuing a relationship with the company.

“Giving drivers propaganda to deliver really crosses an ethical line,” the restaurateur says. But it doesn’t appear that every restaurant owner feels that way: when Eater SF clicked on the link the email provided to request bags on Friday morning, we received a message that “due to high demand for Yes on Prop 22 branded to-go bags, we are no longing [sic] accepting requests.”

This email was sent to DoorDash restaurants on Thursday, October 15.
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samuel
4 days ago
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Well that's horrifying for the workers, being forced to shill for low wages.
Cambridge, Massachusetts
kclowers
3 days ago
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acdha
4 days ago
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Exhibit A for why corporate speech should be regulated
Washington, DC

Severed cable takes out Virginia voter site on registration deadline

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Richmond, the capital of Virginia, looking scenic as seen from across the James River.

Enlarge / Richmond, the capital of Virginia, looking scenic as seen from across the James River. (credit: Sky Noir Photography by Bill Dickinson | Getty Images)

Today is the last day to register to vote in the commonwealth of Virginia, so of course the official website for updating or managing voter registration is offline. Unlike in Florida, however, Virginia's site did not crash from high traffic but instead was rendered inaccessible because a vital fiber connecting the state's digital infrastructure was physically cut.

Twitter users began to notice the state's voter registration page was failing to load sometime after 8:30 this morning, and at 9:00, the state's IT agency confirmed that a severed fiber optic cable was the root of all the problems.

"A fiber cut near Rt. 10 in Chester near the Commonwealth Enterprise Solutions Center (CESC) is impacting data circuits and virtual private network (VPN) connectivity for multiple Commonwealth agencies," the Virginia Information Technologies Agency wrote in a tweet, adding, "Technicians are on site and working to repair the cut; updates will be provided as work progresses."

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kclowers
6 days ago
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